How do I make optimal use of my solar panels with a smart meter?

With the arrival of the smart meter and the abolition of the revolving counter scheme, many questions arise about the yield model of electric solar panels. Below I would like to explain what the consequences are and how best to deal with them.

Where the regulation with reverting counter guarantees that your annual yield can be used over the year without being bound by time, a smart meter will register how much of your generated energy you don’t use and therefore export. These exports are reimbursed at a much lower rate than you would save by avoiding import flows. The distribution network operator was reimbursed with a prosumer rate for transporting your surplus and then returning it to it. Logically, the prosumer rate disappears with the disappearance of the revolving counter.

In terms of sustainability, the reversing counter made no sense because your summer surplus that you use in winter no longer necessarily comes from sustainable sources. With the smart meter, consumers are encouraged to respond much better to the use of sustainable energy sources.

In a household, it is not easy to make maximum use of the yield of your solar panels because the large consumers such as the washing machine, dryer or kitchen appliances consume power in peaks of a few dozen minutes, while the yield of your panels spreads over the day. For maximum yield with a smart meter, it is therefore important that you consume the yield of your solar panels locally and not export it. Without active measures, typically only a third of your revenue is consumed locally and the rest is exported on the net. A few measures can help to increase consumption on site from one third to two thirds of your production.

A battery is the perfect solution to smooth out these peaks and spread the yield from your panels throughout the day and night. This solution is still quite expensive for a home application. The government supports this measure to make it more attractive, so that your investment in a battery has a return of less than ten years.

There are also simpler measures to make better use of your own yield in a smart way: setting the timer of your washing machine or dishwasher so that it starts when there is maximum yield, or charging the battery of your laptop in sunlight. With an electric hot water boiler, the timer can be switched from heating at night to during the day around noon.

P1 slimme meter lezer

In the future, a smart meter can help automate these actions. The meter indicates when you have a power surplus, and a logical system can give smart indications to washing machine, dryer and hot water boiler, but also to your freezer or other specific appliances such as heat pumps, space cooling or accumulation heaters. A step further is the use of weather forecasts and artificial intelligence to optimally adjust your consumption behaviour to the available power production.

SensEnergies has developed a device to read the smart meter together with the water meter and to visualize the consumption data in one portal. SenSenergies can further help to work out specific solutions based on the measured data with tailor-made control and logic.

With the arrival of the smart meter and the abolition of the revolving counter scheme, many questions arise about the yield model of electric solar panels. Below I would like to explain what the consequences are and how best to deal with them.

Where the regulation with reverting counter guarantees that your annual yield can be used over the year without being bound by time, a smart meter will register how much of your generated energy you don’t use and therefore export. These exports are reimbursed at a much lower rate than you would save by avoiding import flows. The distribution network operator was reimbursed with a prosumer rate for transporting your surplus and then returning it to it. Logically, the prosumer rate disappears with the disappearance of the revolving counter.

In terms of sustainability, the reversing counter made no sense because your summer surplus that you use in winter no longer necessarily comes from sustainable sources. With the smart meter, consumers are encouraged to respond much better to the use of sustainable energy sources.

In a household, it is not easy to make maximum use of the yield of your solar panels because the large consumers such as the washing machine, dryer or kitchen appliances consume power in peaks of a few dozen minutes, while the yield of your panels spreads over the day. For maximum yield with a smart meter, it is therefore important that you consume the yield of your solar panels locally and not export it. Without active measures, typically only a third of your revenue is consumed locally and the rest is exported on the net. A few measures can help to increase consumption on site from one third to two thirds of your production.

A battery is the perfect solution to smooth out these peaks and spread the yield from your panels throughout the day and night. This solution is still quite expensive for a home application. The government supports this measure to make it more attractive, so that your investment in a battery has a return of less than ten years.

There are also simpler measures to make better use of your own yield in a smart way: setting the timer of your washing machine or dishwasher so that it starts when there is maximum yield, or charging the battery of your laptop in sunlight. With an electric hot water boiler, the timer can be switched from heating at night to during the day around noon.

P1 slimme meter lezer

In the future, a smart meter can help automate these actions. The meter indicates when you have a power surplus, and a logical system can give smart indications to washing machine, dryer and hot water boiler, but also to your freezer or other specific appliances such as heat pumps, space cooling or accumulation heaters. A step further is the use of weather forecasts and artificial intelligence to optimally adjust your consumption behaviour to the available power production.

SensEnergies has developed a device to read the smart meter together with the water meter and to visualize the consumption data in one portal. SenSenergies can further help to work out specific solutions based on the measured data with tailor-made control and logic.

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